STUDY FINDS SLEEP-DEPRIVED PEOPLE SPEND LESS TIME ATTENDING TO FACES

by Laura Staloch October 22, 2022 in Social Psychology Researchers at Uppsala University Sweden investigated the relationship between sleep deprivation and facial recognition behaviors. Their results indicate that those who experience sleep deprivation reduce the overall time they observe faces and tend to perceive them as less attractive and trustworthy. These findings suggest that the chronically sleep-deprived could …

STUDY FINDS SLEEP-DEPRIVED PEOPLE SPEND LESS TIME ATTENDING TO FACES Read More »

SHARING CONTENT MAKES PEOPLE FEEL MORE KNOWLEDGEABLE – RESEARCH

by Vladimir Hedrih October 26, 2022 in Cognitive Science, Social Media A recent series of studies showed that sharing content online, even when the person did not read it, increases subjective knowledge (how much one thinks he/she knows about a topic), but not necessarily objective (how much he/she really knows about the topic). The effect was stronger …

SHARING CONTENT MAKES PEOPLE FEEL MORE KNOWLEDGEABLE – RESEARCH Read More »

Binti World – Sanitizing Menstruation Taboo

Anni Gakii is the founder Binti Mwangaza, a community-based organization [CBO] in Nanyuki. Since 2012 Binti Mwangaza has been offering affordable and reusable alternative sanitary towels to young and impoverished girls who could afford the normal pads. Anni’s Community Based Organisation has so far reached more than 4,000 girls during that period many of whom …

Binti World – Sanitizing Menstruation Taboo Read More »

Countries with more stringent lockdowns ‘had less mental-related illness’

By Emily Manis Many people feel their well-being and mental state suffered as a result of being locked inside during the early waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, but could stricter and longer lockdowns actually have positive effects on people’s mental health? A study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research suggests that countries with more …

Countries with more stringent lockdowns ‘had less mental-related illness’ Read More »

Laughter with friends differs from laughter with romantic partners, study finds

By Mane Kara-Yakoubian In humans, the ability to laugh emerges as early as four months of age, with laughter being the most recognizable expression of positive emotion across cultures. Laughter, a means of communicating social information (e.g., harmless intentions), is not unique to humans however, suggesting it dates back to a shared ancestor. But along …

Laughter with friends differs from laughter with romantic partners, study finds Read More »

Self-control during adolescence predicts the tendency to forgive others in adulthood, study finds

By Eric Dolan “I am interested in the predictive power of personality change. Research has consistently demonstrated that personality traits such as conscientiousness or trait self-control predict important life outcomes including education, work and relationship success, well-being, health, and longevity,” explained study author Mathias Allemand, an assistant professor at the University of Zurich. “Moreover, there …

Self-control during adolescence predicts the tendency to forgive others in adulthood, study finds Read More »